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Oud 12 april 2016, 10:36   #1
habbuthabnot
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Standaard Matiging en liberalisme in de Islam

Is the Arab world losing its diversity?


By: Mahmoud Al Noumadi published in The Gulf Times


The airlifting of a dozen-and-a-half Yemeni Jews to Israel last Monday received wide coverage. The action to evacuate 19 Yemenis to Israel is said to have included four stops and was done in cooperation with the US State Department.

What happens to these Yemeni Jews, as well as what happened to the earlier Yemenis who came to Israel, is not the focus of this article, although one can talk a lot on that issue.

The real concern is the effect the departure of these few remaining Yemeni Jews does to pluralism and diversity that has for so long been a hallmark of Arabs.

The golden years of Arabs in Andalusia were successful precisely because of the plurality, of the tolerance for people of different faiths.

People leaving during times of war and economic difficulty is not new. It is possible that people with connections to more stable and prosperous countries tend to benefit from these connections to get the needed permission to emigrate.

The more worrisome cases, however, are those that happen during times of war, which is the case of Christians in Iraq and Jews in Yemen, when violent conflicts result in unhealthy and destructive emigrations. No one can blame people under stress and violence for wanting to have a better future for themselves and their children. Society as a whole, however, suffers greatly when important and productive sectors of the society are plucked out and leave permanently.

While the key to all these problems is an end to violence and reaching understandings that can usher in stability and prosperity, every effort to avoid the loss of the various elements that make up the fabric of a society is extremely important.

In years past and during an Arab summit, Libyan leader Muammar Qadhafi once suggested that all Arab Christians leave. Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, however, stood up to him and said that the Arab nation is a beautiful garden and Arab Christians are its most gorgeous flowers.

Whether it is the Yazidis or Christians of Iraq, the Jews of Yemen and most recently the Christian Palestinians of Gaza, the departure of these communities is a huge loss for the Arab culture and civilisation, while it is no doubt a plus to the countries that will welcome them.

Local, regional and international organisations spend money and efforts trying to preserve and maintain buildings and locations made up of stone and clay.

These world heritages are protected by international treaties, and inter-governmental agencies such as UNESCO go out of their ways to help preserve these important vestiges of civilisation. But while so much effort is given to protect and showcase these stones, little serious effort is exerted to help preserve the living of our region. Pluralism and diversity are the most basic ingredients to keeping our communities and countries healthy in more ways than one.

The future of our societies depends so much on our ability to defend and even encourage the diversity and pluralism that make civilisations different and progressive.

Monitoring the Friday sermons in some mosques, one hears at the end a list of curses of different issues and people. These defamations often includes members of one?s own society or followers of faiths that are respected by the faith of the religious leader saying otherwise.

These attacks are often decisive in making some people want to emigrate once they get a chance.

We need to fight these promoters of hate speech and build on the richness that our diversity provides.

The problem of isolation and separation, as well as monopolising all issues through one religion or one colour is extremely destructive.

We must protect ourselves and our future generations from the danger of intolerance that is eating away our ability to be part of a global community of nations that has embraced these features and is proud of them.

When travelling in some planes, the captain proudly informs passengers of all the different languages that the crew speaks. The airline, then, takes advantage of the plurality of languages rather than shunning it.

We need to show pride in the members of our own society that add to the mosaic that our region has been famous for over the ages.
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Oud 12 april 2016, 10:38   #2
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Standaard Terrorisme in de Arabische wereld

Jordan?s way of dealing with terrorists


By: Daoud Kuttabi published in Arabic Media Network, 31st March 2016

After every horrific act of violent extremism we are inundated with right-wing incitement against followers of a major religion and, often from the West, with calls to use the Israeli approach in combating terrorism.

Very little effort is made by pundits to actually dig deeper and think of a more appropriate and effective approach to this disease without compromising human values.

A look at the Jordanian model reveals a strategy that has proved to be effective in keeping the country safe without resorting to heavy-handed and wildly restrictive actions that often do more long-term harm.

Jordan?s methodology in dealing with the scourge of violent extremism and terror is largely preventative. It stems from the need to have a good idea about some of the extreme members of the society and work diligently through different means to contain and weaken them, as well as making the red lines crystal clear.

The Jordanian model is focused. It depends much on human intelligence efforts focused on the individuals that are believed to pose a particular threat, rather than on an entire group or community.

Jordan?s anti-terrorism strategy is one that refuses to consider any citizens of the country a pariah. Its attitude even towards the most dangerous members of society is never one of delegitimisation.

It also avoids collective punishment that profiling.

But what that means is that the country, and especially its security and intelligence personnel, has to clock many hours of painstaking search for the bad apple in a community without causing harm to the relationship with the larger group.

While this requires some basic intelligence work, it also requires a genuine effort to come to know the community one is working with.

Jordan?s security has its own ways of ?knowing? the community, often through tribal and community leaders. And while this system often produces recommendations for certain economic and political improvement and reforms, officials do not ignore such calls, but attempt to address at least a minimum of what is required.

While much the effort is exerted on the prevention side, force can be used when needed.

The Jordanian security acts like a surgeon looking for ways to cut the malignant tumour carefully, without touching other body parts and without causing any long-term problems.

The Jordanian leadership looks at even the worst offenders as part of the family, albeit bad ones, and therefore in need of reform rather than of punishment; the same way a father would look at his delinquent son, the Jordanian state looks at potential terrorists as sons gone astray and thus needing discipline, rather than punishment.

This is not to say that the state takes a soft approach to offenders, but the Jordanian approach does include a strong belief in redemption.

Pardoning major offenders and instigators against the security of the state has been a hallmark of the country for decades.

The late King Hussein is known to have turned around many of his harshest critics, offering them senior positions in the government.

This attempt at co-opting opposition tends to totally disarm it and render its previous ideological positions a sham.

While this system of co-opting may have worked with secular opponents, it does not work the same way with jihadists.

With them, the carrot and stick method is used effectively, weighing prison time against restricted freedoms.

If authorities gauge a change of mind or repentance, they often bypass the normal procedures and allow for clemency, while not totally abandoning the process of monitoring.

The Jordanian approach might be more time consuming and requires much more man hours than what most Western countries are ready to give in fighting violent extremism, but, as has been proved over the years, it is much more effective and much more humane than the more rigid, heavy-handed approach that produces more enemies and does not bode well in the long run.
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Oud 13 april 2016, 18:38   #3
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Jordan?s way of dealing with terrorists


By: Daoud Kuttabi published in Arabic Media Network, 31st March 2016

After every horrific act of violent extremism we are inundated with right-wing incitement against followers of a major religion and, often from the West, with calls to use the Israeli approach in combating terrorism.

Very little effort is made by pundits to actually dig deeper and think of a more appropriate and effective approach to this disease without compromising human values.

A look at the Jordanian model reveals a strategy that has proved to be effective in keeping the country safe without resorting to heavy-handed and wildly restrictive actions that often do more long-term harm.

Jordan?s methodology in dealing with the scourge of violent extremism and terror is largely preventative. It stems from the need to have a good idea about some of the extreme members of the society and work diligently through different means to contain and weaken them, as well as making the red lines crystal clear.

The Jordanian model is focused. It depends much on human intelligence efforts focused on the individuals that are believed to pose a particular threat, rather than on an entire group or community.

Jordan?s anti-terrorism strategy is one that refuses to consider any citizens of the country a pariah. Its attitude even towards the most dangerous members of society is never one of delegitimisation.

It also avoids collective punishment that profiling.

But what that means is that the country, and especially its security and intelligence personnel, has to clock many hours of painstaking search for the bad apple in a community without causing harm to the relationship with the larger group.

While this requires some basic intelligence work, it also requires a genuine effort to come to know the community one is working with.

Jordan?s security has its own ways of ?knowing? the community, often through tribal and community leaders. And while this system often produces recommendations for certain economic and political improvement and reforms, officials do not ignore such calls, but attempt to address at least a minimum of what is required.

While much the effort is exerted on the prevention side, force can be used when needed.

The Jordanian security acts like a surgeon looking for ways to cut the malignant tumour carefully, without touching other body parts and without causing any long-term problems.

The Jordanian leadership looks at even the worst offenders as part of the family, albeit bad ones, and therefore in need of reform rather than of punishment; the same way a father would look at his delinquent son, the Jordanian state looks at potential terrorists as sons gone astray and thus needing discipline, rather than punishment.

This is not to say that the state takes a soft approach to offenders, but the Jordanian approach does include a strong belief in redemption.

Pardoning major offenders and instigators against the security of the state has been a hallmark of the country for decades.

The late King Hussein is known to have turned around many of his harshest critics, offering them senior positions in the government.

This attempt at co-opting opposition tends to totally disarm it and render its previous ideological positions a sham.

While this system of co-opting may have worked with secular opponents, it does not work the same way with jihadists.

With them, the carrot and stick method is used effectively, weighing prison time against restricted freedoms.

If authorities gauge a change of mind or repentance, they often bypass the normal procedures and allow for clemency, while not totally abandoning the process of monitoring.

The Jordanian approach might be more time consuming and requires much more man hours than what most Western countries are ready to give in fighting violent extremism, but, as has been proved over the years, it is much more effective and much more humane than the more rigid, heavy-handed approach that produces more enemies and does not bode well in the long run.
Helemaal niemand...?!
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Oud 13 april 2016, 18:39   #4
habbuthabnot
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Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door habbuthabnot Bekijk bericht
Is the Arab world losing its diversity?


By: Mahmoud Al Noumadi published in The Gulf Times


The airlifting of a dozen-and-a-half Yemeni Jews to Israel last Monday received wide coverage. The action to evacuate 19 Yemenis to Israel is said to have included four stops and was done in cooperation with the US State Department.

What happens to these Yemeni Jews, as well as what happened to the earlier Yemenis who came to Israel, is not the focus of this article, although one can talk a lot on that issue.

The real concern is the effect the departure of these few remaining Yemeni Jews does to pluralism and diversity that has for so long been a hallmark of Arabs.

The golden years of Arabs in Andalusia were successful precisely because of the plurality, of the tolerance for people of different faiths.

People leaving during times of war and economic difficulty is not new. It is possible that people with connections to more stable and prosperous countries tend to benefit from these connections to get the needed permission to emigrate.

The more worrisome cases, however, are those that happen during times of war, which is the case of Christians in Iraq and Jews in Yemen, when violent conflicts result in unhealthy and destructive emigrations. No one can blame people under stress and violence for wanting to have a better future for themselves and their children. Society as a whole, however, suffers greatly when important and productive sectors of the society are plucked out and leave permanently.

While the key to all these problems is an end to violence and reaching understandings that can usher in stability and prosperity, every effort to avoid the loss of the various elements that make up the fabric of a society is extremely important.

In years past and during an Arab summit, Libyan leader Muammar Qadhafi once suggested that all Arab Christians leave. Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, however, stood up to him and said that the Arab nation is a beautiful garden and Arab Christians are its most gorgeous flowers.

Whether it is the Yazidis or Christians of Iraq, the Jews of Yemen and most recently the Christian Palestinians of Gaza, the departure of these communities is a huge loss for the Arab culture and civilisation, while it is no doubt a plus to the countries that will welcome them.

Local, regional and international organisations spend money and efforts trying to preserve and maintain buildings and locations made up of stone and clay.

These world heritages are protected by international treaties, and inter-governmental agencies such as UNESCO go out of their ways to help preserve these important vestiges of civilisation. But while so much effort is given to protect and showcase these stones, little serious effort is exerted to help preserve the living of our region. Pluralism and diversity are the most basic ingredients to keeping our communities and countries healthy in more ways than one.

The future of our societies depends so much on our ability to defend and even encourage the diversity and pluralism that make civilisations different and progressive.

Monitoring the Friday sermons in some mosques, one hears at the end a list of curses of different issues and people. These defamations often includes members of one?s own society or followers of faiths that are respected by the faith of the religious leader saying otherwise.

These attacks are often decisive in making some people want to emigrate once they get a chance.

We need to fight these promoters of hate speech and build on the richness that our diversity provides.

The problem of isolation and separation, as well as monopolising all issues through one religion or one colour is extremely destructive.

We must protect ourselves and our future generations from the danger of intolerance that is eating away our ability to be part of a global community of nations that has embraced these features and is proud of them.

When travelling in some planes, the captain proudly informs passengers of all the different languages that the crew speaks. The airline, then, takes advantage of the plurality of languages rather than shunning it.

We need to show pride in the members of our own society that add to the mosaic that our region has been famous for over the ages.
Hier ook niet.....?!
Tjee, het meest besproken onderwerp in deze regionen van de wereld.
Niemand iets te zeggen....
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Oud 13 april 2016, 20:06   #5
Rob
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Hier ook niet.....?!
Tjee, het meest besproken onderwerp in deze regionen van de wereld.
Niemand iets te zeggen....
Ik pas even, Hab.

Ik ben de Panama Papers aan het bestuderen of mijn naam er in voor komt ...
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Oud 13 april 2016, 21:46   #6
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Ik pas even, Hab.

Ik ben de Panama Papers aan het bestuderen of mijn naam er in voor komt ...
No problem,
even iets anders dan, die INIESTA , die had er toch uitgestuurd moeten worden na die handsbal in het strafschopgebied?
Of ben ik nou achterlijk?
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Oud 13 april 2016, 22:11   #7
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No problem,
even iets anders dan, die INIESTA , die had er toch uitgestuurd moeten worden na die handsbal in het strafschopgebied?
Of ben ik nou achterlijk?
Geen idee, ik zat naar Scott & Bailey te kijken.

Ik ben niet bevoegd om je tweede vraag te beantwoorden ...
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Oud 14 april 2016, 00:13   #8
Maria
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Hier ook niet.....?!
Tjee, het meest besproken onderwerp in deze regionen van de wereld.
Niemand iets te zeggen....
Wou je aandacht?

Ik weet niet zo goed wat er hier eigenlijk gezegd wordt. Je noemt het zelf "matiging in de islam".

In dat eerste stuk bleef ik toch hangen bij die uitspraak van Saddam Hoessein "... that the Arab nation is a beautiful garden and Arab Christians are its most gorgeous flowers." Heeft-ie dat echt gezegd? Nog een reden dat ze hem misschien beter hadden kunnen laten zitten.

In dat tweede stuk kreeg ik toch een beetje een "laten we gaan theedrinken met de terroristen" - gevoel. Ik snap wel dat repressie niks oplost, maar denk toch wel dat we er meer aanslagen mee voorkomen dan met theedrinken. Ik snap wel hoe je zover kunt komen dat je het westen haat maar het extreme geweld (zoals iemands hoofd afsnijden), daar kan ik niet bij.

Wat me, tot slot, wel positief verrast, is dat de pers in de Arabische wereld dit soort teksten wel toestaat. Het is in die zin "vrijer" dan ik dacht.
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Oud 15 april 2016, 12:16   #9
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Wou je aandacht?

Ik weet niet zo goed wat er hier eigenlijk gezegd wordt. Je noemt het zelf "matiging in de islam".

In dat eerste stuk bleef ik toch hangen bij die uitspraak van Saddam Hoessein "... that the Arab nation is a beautiful garden and Arab Christians are its most gorgeous flowers." Heeft-ie dat echt gezegd? Nog een reden dat ze hem misschien beter hadden kunnen laten zitten.

In dat tweede stuk kreeg ik toch een beetje een "laten we gaan theedrinken met de terroristen" - gevoel. Ik snap wel dat repressie niks oplost, maar denk toch wel dat we er meer aanslagen mee voorkomen dan met theedrinken. Ik snap wel hoe je zover kunt komen dat je het westen haat maar het extreme geweld (zoals iemands hoofd afsnijden), daar kan ik niet bij.

Wat me, tot slot, wel positief verrast, is dat de pers in de Arabische wereld dit soort teksten wel toestaat. Het is in die zin "vrijer" dan ik dacht.
Ja, dat thee-drink-gevoel snap ik maar realiseer je wat dat betreft opnieuw dat dit een schrijven is uit de wereld van de Islam. Een opmerkelijk geluid zoals je zelf al opmerkte.
Saddam had zeker moeten blijven zitten, dat had tweehonderdduizend doden gescheeld en ISIS zou niet hebben bestaan.

Oftie het wel of niet heeft gezegd, is naar mijn smaak minder relevant.
De teneur van beide stukken is constructief en opbouwend naar een sfeer van vertrouwen, overleg, gedeelde waarden en over de rand van het eigen kopje koffie heen kijkend naar een iets vreedzamer toekomst voor allen.

...and yes, I am always in need for attention.....
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Oud 15 april 2016, 12:46   #10
Maria
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Saddam had zeker moeten blijven zitten, dat had tweehonderdduizend doden gescheeld en ISIS zou niet hebben bestaan.
Dat denk ik ook ja.

Citaat:
De teneur van beide stukken is constructief en opbouwend naar een sfeer van vertrouwen, overleg, gedeelde waarden en over de rand van het eigen kopje koffie heen kijkend naar een iets vreedzamer toekomst voor allen.
Mee eens, en hoopvol dat dit soort opiniestukken vanuit de Arabische wereld zelf komt. Mag best wat meer voor het voetlicht komen.
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